Department of PsychologyUniversity of Hawaii at Manoa

Department of Psychology Faculty Profile

Charlene Baker

Charlene Baker

Professor - Department Chair

Education

PhD, Georgia State University (2002); MA, Georgia State University (1999); BS, Michigan State University (1996).

Research

Intervention development and evaluation; Prevention of domestic violence and homelessness in culturally diverse communities. Understanding the intersection of dating violence and technology use.

Dr. Baker’s research is focused on understanding the causes of and strategies for preventing violence against women and children. Specifically, she examines how individual, family, community, systems, and societal factors influence social problems, and in particular emphasizes the intersection of social problems; e.g., domestic violence and homelessness; dating violence and substance use. Dr. Baker's current line of research is focused on exploring the intersection of dating violence and technology use among adolescents and young adults.

Publications

Rebuild or Relocate? Resilience and Post-Disaster Decision-Making After Hurricane Sandy (2015)
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  Type: Articles in international or national refereed journals
  Co-Authors: Brokopp Binder, S., Barile, J., & Baker, C.K.

Understanding the Role of Technology in Adolescent Dating and Dating Violence (2015)
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  Type: Articles in international or national refereed journals
  Co-Authors: Baker, C.K., & Carreno, P.K.

The Relationship between Self-Harm and Teen Dating Violence among Youth in Hawaii (2015)
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  Type: Articles in international or national refereed journals
  Co-Authors: Baker, C.K., Helm, S., Bilfulco, K., & Chun-Do, J.

Dating Violence and Substance Use: Exploring the Context of Adolescent Relationships (2014)
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  Type: Articles in international or national refereed journals
  Co-Authors: Baker, C.K.

Connections between Domestic Violence and Homelessness (2014)
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  Type: Chapters in books
  Co-Authors: Baker, C.K.

Utilizing a Train-the-Trainer Model for Sexual Violence Prevention: Findings from a Pilot Study with High School Students of Asian and Pacific Islander Descent in Hawaii (2014)
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  Type: Articles in international or national refereed journals
  Co-Authors: Baker, C.K., Naai, R., Mitchell, J., & Trecker, C.

The Need to Consider Ethnocultural Context in Prevention Programming: A Case Example from Hawaii (2011)
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  Type: Articles in international or national refereed journals
  Co-Authors: Helm, S., & Baker, C.K.

Domestic Violence, Housing Instability, and Homelessness: A Review of Housing Policies and Program Practices for Meeting the Needs of Survivors (2010)
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  Type: Articles in international or national refereed journals
  Co-Authors: Baker, C.K., Billhardt, K., Warren, J., Rollins, C., & Glass, N.

Moving beyond the individual: Examining the effects of domestic violence policies on social norms (2003)
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  Type: Articles in international or national refereed journals
  Co-Authors: Salazar, L.F., Baker, C.K., & Price, A.W.

Domestic violence and housing problems: A contextual analysis of women's helpseeking, received informal support, and formal system response (2003)
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  Type: Articles in international or national refereed journals
  Co-Authors: Baker, C.K., Cook, S.L., & Norris, F.H.

Research Projects

An Ecological Assessment of New York's Home Buyout Program: Exploring the Lived Experiences and Implications for Affected Households and Communities (2015 - ) : Recently, states impacted by major natural disasters have attempted to facilitate the large-scale relocation of residents out of at-risk areas through the implementation of home buyout programs. While these programs offer potential benefits as disaster mitigation policy tools, previous studies have suggested that postdisaster relocation may negatively impact residents, and significant gaps exist in our understanding of the broader impacts of home buyout programs on participating and affected, non-participating communities. Building on a 2013 study that explored the role of community resilience in buyout decision-making in communities affected by a post-Sandy home buyout program in New York, the proposed project examines the experiences of households and communities in the mid-term relocation and recovery period. The study examines three key dimensions of the postdisaster home buyout experience: heterogeneity of buyout decision-making within communities; lived experiences of buyouts and relocation over time, and secondary impacts of buyouts on affected, non-participating households and communities.

Using an ecological, comparative approach, this study employs mixed-methods to explore processes and impacts related to home buyouts over time and at multiple levels. Residents of three communities with distinctive buyout experiences (one community where most residents chose to accept a buyout, one where most chose to reject a buyout, and one non-participating community adjacent to the relocated community) will be invited to participate using a purposive sampling strategy. Participants will be asked to complete in-depth interviews (designed to gather data on the lived experiences and perceived impacts of the buyout or rebuilding process) and surveys (designed to examine indicators related to social capital and place attachment comparatively and longitudinally). Qualitative data will be analyzed using grounded theory and phenomenological methodologies. Quantitative data will be analyzed using latent growth modeling. The use of mixed methods allows for an examination of existing concepts and theories related to postdisaster relocation, and facilitates the identification of previously unidentified concepts and phenomena that will be important to consider in future research.

Understanding the Context of Adolescent IPV among Youth In Hawaii (2012 - 2015 ) : The goal of this project is to explore the context in which adolescent IPV occurs in order to develop culturally grounded and contextually relevant interventions to reduce adolescent IPV in Hawaii. Specifically, focus groups are being conducted with youth who have had problematic relationships in the past. Youth are asked to describe these experiences, including the impact of social electronic media, peers/friends, and alcohol and drugs. We are also exploring the trajectory of these relationships in order to understand how youth enter into, manage, and end problematic/violent relationships.

The SATC Curriculum Evaluation Project (2009 - 2012 ) : This project is evaluating the Sex Abuse Treatment Center's K-12 curricula to prevent sexual violence among children and teens. Curricula are being implemented in schools across Hawaii. The evaluation involves pre and post and follow-up testing of students in elementary, middle, and high school to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and bystander behaviors.

College of Social SciencesUniversity of Hawaii at Manoa